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Posted in: Learner News / Open edX

Why Open edX? Well, for one thing, the coolness factor. Open edX is the cool kid on the block.

– Adolfo Brandes, hastexo

The 2nd annual Open edX Conference was filled with thought-provoking conversations, engaging presentations, and practical takeaways.

More than 200 Open edX enthusiasts, developers, users, researchers, and educators traveled from around the world to join the discussion. Those who weren’t able to attend in person watched keynotes and selected breakout sessions via livestream. All recorded talks from the conference are now freely available to watch on our Open edX YouTube channel.

Here are some of our favorite #OpenedX2015 moments:

Mitch Resnick kicked us off with his keynote on the Ps of learning: projects, peers, play, and passion.

Arti_Sharma_on_Twitter

EdX CEO Anant Agarwal was on site to learn more about the work our contributors are doing, and made friends with the team from Knotes:

Guillaume LAURIE on Twitter

While there, Anant made an announcement about the recent launch of a large Russian Open edX platform…

openedu.ru tweet

…and revealed some impressive Open edX statistics:

David_Baumgold_on_Twitter

Mark Sadecki, Accessibility Specialist at edX, discussed accessibility efforts at edX and accessibility-related updates to the edx.org source code:

Vanessa_Ruano_on_Twitter

We got some great advice on how to contribute to the Open edX platform:

Open_edX_on_Twitter

With a conference that requires so much brain power, sustenance is key. Thanks to some gracious sponsors, the food was pretty amazing:

Open_edX_on_Twitter___A__tease

Philippe Chiu from IONISx gave the world a new perspective on effectively organizing remote participation:

Philippe_Chiu_on_Twitter

Jeff Jaffe, CEO at the W3C closed the conference with a keynote, including a powerful reminder of why web standards matter:

Arti_Sharma_on_Twitter

Thank you to everyone who shared the story of #OpenedX2015!

Videos from the conference are now posted on the Open edX YouTube channel, and hackathon presentations are also available to view online courtesy of Nate Aune of Appsembler. Check them out to get an idea of what people are working on, and how their projects are progressing. Feel free to contact any of the participants to see if you can help. If you attended the conference, please fill out our conference feedback survey to let us know how we can make next year even better. We look forward to seeing you at Open edX 2016!

Thank you, so much, to everyone who attended. We had an amazing time thanks to your enthusiasm, ideas, collaboration, and shared commitment of the Open edX mission.

This post originally ran on the Open edX blog.


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